Africa

Fun in the Sun: A Picturesque Cape Town Road Trip

It was the crack of dawn on a Saturday and we were parked along Boyes Drive, a windy mountain road overlooking the ocean. As the sun rose, the water turned from black to dark blue until streaks of silver appeared where the morning light touched the waves. In the distance, the mountains of Kogelberg Nature Reserve were back lit against a mustard sky.

Muizenberg Beach, SA

Below us, the beach town of Muizenberg was fast asleep, barely recognizable through the haze that covered the view like a blanket. From that height we could see for miles as the waves rolled towards the shore in layers, scalloped like the fabric of an ornate ball gown. Except for the few cars that occasionally drove past; they were all we could hear.

This was our first stop on a road trip from Cape Town proper around South Africa’s southern peninsula. Our journey would take us through Kalk Bay, on to Simon’s Town and Boulders Beach, where the African penguins frolic, then down to Cape Point, followed by Hout Bay on the western coast and past Table Mountain before ending up back in Cape Town 12 hours later.

Karen Larsen, a reader who lives in Fish Hoek, a coastal town on the edge of False Bay, graciously offered to chauffeur me around. In pitch black she picked me up in the wee hours of the morning from The Portswood, my waterfront hotel, only to head back in the direction from whence she came to save me from having to rent a car. Travel is really about the people you meet and Karen is a gem.

The day unfurled slowly, there was no agenda. We stopped to explore on a whim and take pictures when we were inspired. The views were absolutely stunning. It was clear from the get-go that South Africa’s southern peninsula is one of those destinations that when on vacation you stop and question what you’re doing with your life and how you could ever leave.

Here are some pics from our adventure….

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Each morning, locals greet the sunrise at public tide pools along Main Road heading towards the town of Kalk Bay. What a wonderful way to enjoy the ocean while simultaneously being protected from sharks and jellyfish.

Changing rooms along the water in Kalk Bay

Brightly colored changing huts that line the beach near downtown Kalk Bay.

Man practices yoga at water's edge on Kalk Bay

This man has the right idea. It’s shortly after sunrise and he’s starting his day with yoga on the rocks while the ocean laps at his feet.

Dock at Kalk Bay, South Africa

A family enjoys a stroll along the dock in Kalk Bay harbor, others fish for fun. The small lighthouse that guides the boats to the marina at the end.

Seagull eyes a fly in Kalk Bay,South Africa

A seagull looks longingly at a tasty bug overhead. ~ Kalk Bay harbor

Olympia Diner in Kalk Bay, South Africa

We stopped at Olympia Cafe for bit of breakfast in the town of Kalk Bay. An adorable eatery that reminded me of the charming little cafes in New York’s SoHo district. Outside, street artists sell their jewelry and other handmade trinkets.

PanoramaOlympia

Inside Cafe Olympia

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Handmade kudus for sale outside Olympia Cafe

Mystic Dress Shot, Kalk Bay, South Africa

One of the many cute shops along Main Road in Kalk Bay.

Cape to Cuba, interior, Kalk Bay, South Africa

Even though it was closed, I had to check out one of the most popular bars in the town of Kalk Bay called Cape to Cuba —a taste of Havana in South Africa. Notice the sand floor? How fun!

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Simon’s town harbor in the distance and home to South Africa’s Navy.Boulders Beach, Cape Town, South Africa

Just north of downtown Simon’s town, Boulders Beach is aptly named but best known for its colony of over 2000 endangered African (a.k.a Jackass) Penguins. Why Jackass? They sound exactly like a donkey braying when calling to each other. It’s hilarious and very loud.  Cost is 60 rand for adults, 30 rand for children. With the current exchange rate, (dollars to Rand)  it’s less than $6 and $3 respectively.

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Only a few feet away, African penguins hang out on granite boulders estimated to be over 540 million years old. While they’re used to people milling about, they don’t like you to get too close and if you venture beyond their preferred personal space you may get nipped. And it hurts.

SPortnoy_20150328_7405Penguin BFFs take a stroll

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Taking a short dip

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Penguin toes!

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Karen spies a penguin in the rocks on Foxy Beach, a great place to see penguins and a short walk from Boulder Beach.

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Karen’s target: Tucked in a hole created by three different boulders, this penguin looks as if he’s smirking at us

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Cape Point, the Southern most tip of South Africa. The ocean spray flies dozens of feet in the air as it strikes the rocks along the shore. Though you can’t see in this photo, Cape Point is a major tourist attraction with cars, buses and bikes moving in and out. If crowds make you crazy, you might want to skip this.

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Baboons are a fact of life in the Cape Town area. They are fascinating to watch but be careful. They have 3 inch incisors and if they think you have food they can walk right up and take it out of your hand. If they feel frustrated or threatened they’ll bite and you really won’t enjoy that. We saw this large male sitting on a street sign just north of Cape Point checking out the cars and having a good yawn.

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Scorched bushes and barren hills high above the Cape Town area are all that remain after a terrible brush fire that broke out a a few weeks before my arrival. Beginning in high in the hills of Muizenberg, the fire moved west towards Hout Bay.  It was the worst fire in 15 years and lasted for days, destroying countless acres of terrain.

Cape Town, South Africa

A close up of one of the scorched plants still standing after the Cape Town firesselfie

Had to do it: Table mountain selfie near the end of our road trip.

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A large tanker floats under the setting sun and brings our lovely road trip to a close.

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